Devil Woman

 

Cliff Richard -- Devil Woman

An in-depth song analysis


  • Record Date: September 8 & 9 1975
  • Record Location: Abbey Road, London
  • Written By: Terry Britten & Christine Holmes
  • Arranged By: Bruce Welch
  • Produced By: Bruce Welch
  • Engineered By: Tony Clark & John Barrett
  • Performed By: Cliff Richard (vocals), Terry Britten (guitar), Alan Tarney (bass), Clem Cattini (drums), Graham Todd (keyboards), Tony Rivers (backing vocals), John Perry (backing vocals), Ken Gold (backing vocals)

    Initially Released On: I'm Nearly Famous LP album (1976 May UK EMI EMC 3122)

  • Comments and Observations

    Recording the Song: Devil Woman was recorded at Abbey Road in London on September 8 and 9, 1975, at sessions which also produced the popular Miss You Nights song. It was the first session produced by Bruce Welch exclusively and the first session recording with backing vocalists Tony Rivers, John Perry and Ken Gold, whom Cliff would use for many years to come. (Despite what is written in the album's liner notes and various books, Tony Harding did not perform on the song.)

    The song had been presented to Cliff months earlier by writer Terry Britten, but Cliff had rejected it. It was at producer Bruce Welch's persistence that Cliff finally recorded the song. The song was presented to Cliff again at the same time as Miss You Nights and I Can't As For Any More Than You. It was at this point that Cliff finally agreed to recorded it, although he remained reluctant.

    It is unclear why Cliff was resistant to recording the song af first, but it has been suggested that he primarily did not like the lyrics and their fortune-telling theme. Bruce Welch persisted and Cliff finally relented after changing some of the lyrics to more overtly suggest that the "devil woman" was dangerous and should be avoided. It is unknown what the original lyrics were that Cliff changed. The lyrics as performed on the Kristine I'm A Song album, are sung in third person ("He's had nothing but bad luck..."), use the lyrics "I can see me a gypsy woman" instead of "I can see me a tall dark stranger" and "and he knew what he came there for" instead of and "I wonder what I came there for" in the second verse, and excludes the "stay away" and "look out" lyrics from the second bridge. It is known that Cliff added the "Stay away! Look out!" parts, however if this and the aforementioned changes are all that Cliff changed, then he changed very little at all for his version. He also likely changed the line to "I wonder what I came there for" which clearly obscures the meaning of what he, the singer, was doing there.

    During the recording, Tony Clark apparently enthused that the song would be a hit in America. Perhaps the other didn't believe him, but Tony's words turned to be prophetic.

    Releases: The song was released as a 7" single in the UK by EMI on May 1976 with stock number "EMI 2448" and having the Cliff Richard-penned song Love On (Shine On), a song unique to this single, on the B-side. It was also the 8th track on the I'm Nearly Famous album and the second single taken from that album (with the first being Miss You Nights). It is Cliff's 66th single release (approximately, as the counting of Cliff's singles varies depending upon how they are counted). The single was reissued in 1981 with the same stock number, but this time with an original picture sleeve and a new record label. It was released in the USA as a 7" single on a Rocket Record Company single (PIG-40574) with the same Love On (Shine On) song on the B-side and on the I'm Nearly Famous LP, the first Cliff LP release in the US since the Two A Penny soundtrack in 1968.

    Devil Woman was released during a period when Cliff's popularity and chart success were waning. It was the first top ten hit since 1973 and the third top ten hit of the 1970s. It entered the UK Top 50 chart on May 8, 1976, peaked at #9 on June 5, 1976, and spent 8 weeks in the chart. Although it was not a monster hit in the UK, it had big international success. It is also significant that it was a breakout hit for Cliff in the USA, being his first USA charting song since 1968's Congratulations (which peaked at a meager #99). It entered the Billboard Hot 100 chart on July 4, 1976, reached #6 for three consecutive weeks on September 26, October 3 and October 10, 1976, spending 22 weeks in the chart. It is Cliff's highest charting hit on the USA charts ever, being certified gold (having sold a million copies) on October 20, 1976. The song has a curious distinction of being the only Cliff Richard song that charted higher in the USA than it did in Cliff's home country of the UK.

    The song is a truely pivotal song, ushering in a renaissance for Cliff. The I'm Nearly Famous LP is the first LP of many successful LPs that featured exclusive production by Shadow Bruce Welch. The album was also picked up by Rocket Record Company in the USA thanks to the insistance of Cliff's friend, Elton John, where a major push behind the album and Devil Woman single was able to propel them both to great success. Today, the I'm Nearly Famous album is considered by fans and critics to be one of Cliff's finest, with both Devil Woman and Miss You Nights still being played on the radio and performed in concerts today.

    Cliff found out about the song's success in America while performing a concert in Hong Kong. He was on stage, speaking to the audience during the concert, when Bruce walk across the stage and whispered the song had "made it" in America. Surely Cliff was chuffed at the news, although it's unclear how he reacted while on stage.

    Writing the Song: The song was written based upon a riff that Terry Britten had developed. The riff had a mysterious vibe to it, like I Heard It Through The Grapevine, but Terry had not yet developed it into a song. He met Christine Holmes and played her the riff. Hearing the mysterious vibe of the song, she had to idea to use the theme from her book of ideas about a fortune telling seductress. Thus the pair went to her flat in Kensington and wrote the song together, with Terry writing the music and Christine writing the words. This song is the only collaboration they did together.

    There has been a lot of confusion over exactly who wrote the song. Although Britten's authorship has never been questioned, Holmes' has varied greatly because of the many stage names she has used over the years. Her birth name is Christine Hodgson, for a while she was using the stage name Kristine Sparkle, and she was married to Barry Authors and sometimes using his family name professionally. Thus the writing credits vary radically, with the first name sometimes written as "Christine" or "Kristine" combined with variable last names, including "Holmes", "Hodgson", "Sparkle", "Authors" and "Anchor". One source even credits the song to Barry Authors himself, which is clearly an error. But the most proper credit is for Christine Holmes as that is the name she finally settled on using. Curiously, although Cliff went on to record many Terry Britten songs, he never recorded any other songs written by Christine Holmes.

    Christine Holmes recorded the song herself under the stage name "Kristine" (no last name) on her 1976 I'm A Song album (it was a single in Canada only), although it remains unclear if she recorded the song before or after Cliff released and had a hit with his version. A sample of the Kristine version can be heard HERE.

    USA Single Mix: On the strength of the material for I'm Nearly Famous, particularly Devil Woman and Miss You Nights, Cliff was signed to the Rocket Record Company in the USA. A decision was made to slightly remaster the song Devil Woman, giving the song more punch with a stronger bass and drum. It was this mix that was used on the USA single, while the album had the standard worldwide single/album mix. A comparison of these mixes can be heard HERE. The first part heard is the original album version, followed by the USA single mix (both the intro and the fade are heard).

    Years later, this mix appeared on the 1989 CD issue of 40 Golden Greats. Why was this mix used for this compilation? It remains a mystery why, but when this 1989 CD compilation was prepared of the original 1978 LP compilation, it is clear that the compilers chose to recompile the tracks and not use the original masters prepared for the LP. Where the LP had several mock stereo versions of the early songs that were recorded only in mono, the CD reverted to the original mono versions as mock stereo was no longer in fashion by the late 1980s. It is assumed the that compilers went looking for what they thought was the best master of Devil Woman and inadvertantly picked up the USA single mix.

    This USA single mix next appeared on the 1998 compilation simply called 1970s. (Several decade-themed compilations were released in 1998). As 1998 was Cliff's 40th anniversary in show business, his catalog had undergone a major overhaul under engineer Keith Bessey. The idea was to remaster the best versions of Cliff's hit songs and use them for all releases from then on. The only 40th anniversary compilation with Devil Woman was the 1970s set and once again, the USA single mix was picked for it. This mix, next appearing on 2000's The Whole Story - His Greatest Hits compilation, has been used on all releases since then, completely replacing the original album mix. The USA single mix was even used on the 2001 remaster of the I'm Nearly Famous album.

    The Song's Meaning: Cliff believes the song to be about the occult and serves as a warning against it, which is the reason he changes the song's lyrics. Songwriter Christine Holmes states is not really about the occult, simply about a fortune telling woman seducing a man. Bruce Welch agrees, stating that it's about a seductress using her sexual prowess to seduce the song's antagonist. The seductress just happens to be a mystical fortune teller, which fits the song's theme of the evil seductress. Indeed, the song's lyrics never explicitly mention the occult; the implication of the occult can be derived in the song's divination theme and the "evil" and "devil" references. Divination is explicitly forbidden in Christian teachings from the Bible (Deuteronomy 18:10), but other than this reference, divination is not necessarily Satanic or evil.

    In interviews, Cliff very often accounts a story of the song for which he is very proud. He tells of having been contacted by a fan in Australia who told of being lost and having no direction in life. She had been considering and dabbling in the occult as a means to finding her needed direction. Upon hearing Cliff's recording of Devil Woman and taking the lyrics to heart, she turned away from the occult and became a Christian very involved in her church. Cliff has told this story many, many times over the years and apparently it's a great source of pride.

    Structure and Lyrics

    Below is the structure of the fullest, most complete version of the originally released song as available on the standard issues of the I'm Nearly Famous album.

    -Guitar Intro
       Guitar intro
    -Verse 1
       I've had nothing but bad luck
       Since the day I saw that cat at my door
       So I came into you sweet lady
       Answering your mystical call
       Crystal ball on the table
       Showing the future, the past
       Same cat with them evil eyes
       And I knew it was a spell she cast

    -Chorus 1
       Ooh!
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you from behind

    -Bridge 1
       Long guitar note
    -Verse 2
       Give me the ring on your finger
       Let me see the lines on your hand
       I can see me a tall dark stranger
       Giving you what you hadn't planned
       I drank the potion she offered me
       I found myself on the floor
       Then I looked in those big green eyes
       And I wonder what I came there for

    -Chorus 2
       Ooh!
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you from behind, from behind

    -Bridge 2
       Stacatto guitar notes with Cliff whispers Stay away! Look out!
    -Verse 3
       If you're out on a moonlit night
       Be careful of the neighbourhood strays
       Of a lady with long black hair
       Trying to win you with her feminine ways
       Crystal ball on the table
       Showing the future, the past
       Same cat with them evil eyes
       You better get out of there fast

    -Chorus 3
       Ooh!
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you

    -Chorus 4
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you... Ah, stay away!
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you (get you!)

    -Chorus 5
       She's just a devil woman
       With evil on her mind
       Beware the devil woman
       She's gonna get you
       She's just a devil woman...

    Variations

    There are three known non-live variations of the original Devil Woman They are:

    -Devil Woman (Standard Release)
    -Devil Woman (USA Single Version)
    -Devil Woman (My Kinda Life Version)

    The standard release was used on the original I'm Nearly Famous LP and the original UK Devil Woman single. There was a punchier mix for the USA single release (although the USA album had the same mix as the UK), that also had a slightly earlier fade. In 1998, this USA single mix superceded the original mix and has been on all releases since then.

    In 1992, Cliff released a French compilation called My Kinda Life (EMI 7994322) in which he reworked several of his previously released songs, enhancing them with new vocals and/or instrumentation. Included in this was a new version of Devil Woman to which guitars, drums and percussion (but no new vocals) were added over the existing backing track. The drums are much stronger and the guitars have more intensity, giving the song a harsher and more "evil" sound. In addition, the fade out is extended by an additional 10 seconds, allowing for all of chorus 5 and part of chorus 6 to be heard.

    Song Section Lyric/Part Devil Woman (Standard Release) Devil Woman (USA Single Version) Devil Woman (My Kinda Life Version)
    Guitar Intro Guitar Intro
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 1 I've had nothing but bad luck
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Since the day I saw that cat at my door
    YES
    YES
    YES
    So I came into you sweet lady
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Answering your mystical call
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Crystal ball on the table
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Showing the future, the past
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Same cat with them evil eyes
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I knew it was a spell she cast
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 1 Ooh!
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you from behind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Bridge 1 Long guitar note
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 2 Give me the ring on your finger
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Let me see the lines on your hand
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I can see me a tall dark stranger
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Giving you what you hadn't planned
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I drank the potion she offered me
    YES
    YES
    YES
    I found myself on the floor
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Then I looked in those big green eyes
    YES
    YES
    YES
    And I wonder what I came there for
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 2 Ooh!
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you from behind, from behind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Bridge 2 Stacatto guitar notes with Cliff whispers Stay away! Look out!
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Verse 3 If you're out on a moonlit night
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Be careful of the neighbourhood strays
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Of a lady with long black hair
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Trying to win you with her feminine ways
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Crystal ball on the table
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Showing the future, the past
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Same cat with them evil eyes
    YES
    YES
    YES
    You better get out of there fast
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 3 Ooh!
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Chorus 4 She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you... Ah, stay away!
    YES
    YES
    YES with additional effects added to the Ah, stay away! lyric
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you (get you!)
    YES
    YES
    YES but without the additional (get you!) lyric
    Chorus 5 She's just a devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    YES
    YES
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    YES
    YES
    YES
    She's gonna get you
    YES
    -
    YES
    She's just a devil woman
    YES
    -
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    -
    -
    YES
    Beware the devil woman
    -
    -
    YES
    She's gonna get you
    -
    -
    YES
    Chorus 6 She's just a devil woman
    -
    -
    YES
    With evil on her mind
    -
    -
    YES
    Beware the devil woman...
    -
    -
    YES

    Musicological Analysis

    From a musicological perspective the song has 4 sections: riff (verse), pre-chorus, chorus and bridge. To understand some of these sections, it is helpful to first understand the blues pentatonic scale. This scale is made up of the 1, flat-3, 4, 5, and flat-7th degrees of the corresponding major scale, so the D blues pentatonic scale - the one relevant to Devil Woman - comprises the (natural) notes D, F, G, A and C.

    A major chord is made up of 3 notes played simultaneously: the root note (after which the chord is named), the note four semi-tones higher than the root note (an interval of a major 3rd, hence this note is called "the 3rd"), and the note 7 semi-tones higher than the root note (an interval of a perfect 5th, hence this note is called "the 5th"). So the major chords based on the D blues pentatonic scale and their spellings are:

    ChordSpelling
    Root3rd5th
    DDF#A
    FFAC
    GGBD
    AAC#E
    CCEG

    This set of chords has been termed the (D) "blues harmonic scale". Note, however, that all of these chords except F major contain notes that are not themselves part of the blues pentatonic scale on which the chords are based:

    Two of these tones - the F# in the D chord and the C# in the A chord - are the natural 3rd and 7th tones of the D major scale. The clash of flat-3rd and flat-7th notes in a melody against the natural 3rd and 7th tones in the accompaniment is one of the most defining features of the blues, and this is exactly what this group of chords gives us when set against the scale comprising their root notes (i.e. the blues pentatonic scale).

    In Devil Woman, the riff that starts the record is a sequence of dyads. A dyad is a pair of notes played simultaneously, so a major chord with one note removed is, by definition, a dyad. The specific chord progression on which the riff is based is D, G, F, C and D (I-IV-bIII-bVII-I) with chord degrees 5, 3, 5, 3 and 3 making up the notes removed to produce the dyads. The riff is repeated twice as the introduction, then two more times as the backing to the first verse. The tune of the verse uses notes from the blues pentatonic scale, giving the verse of Devil Woman a very bluesy flavour and making it a perfect example of a blues melody being harmonised by blues harmonic major chords.

    Following the verse, the pre-chorus - i.e. "Crystal ball on the table .... spell she cast" - shifts to the parallel minor (D minor), mainly utilising the natural form of the minor scale but borrowing the A major chord from the harmonic minor as a transitional chord to the chorus. The tune in this section stays within the mode, using only the 4 natural notes D, E, F and G (the D natural minor scale also includes the notes A, Bb and C, but these do not appear in tune of the pre-chorus). The chord progression in this section is bVII-i-bVII-i-bVII-i-bVI-V (C-Dm-C-Dm-C-Dm-Bb-A), all for one bar each.

    The chorus returns to blues-modal harmony. The first 3 bars has a strictly blues pentatonic tune, all harmonised by a D major chord. The melody for the last bar adds the 2nd degree of the D minor scale (E natural), and is harmonised by an interrupted bVI-bVII cadence - half a bar each of Bb and C. The cadence is completed (back to I) by overlapping the D major chord that signifies the return of the riff.

    After once through the riff the verse, pre-chorus and chorus repeats. This time the interrupted cadence is prolonged by another 4 bars of alternating flat-VI and flat-VII chords (Bb and C) before returning to the riff. For these 4 bars - which comprise the bridge - the harmonic rhythm is halved, with a full bar between each chord change.

    There is no new musical material in the rest of the record: two passes of the riff, the final verse and pre-chorus before concluding with repeated choruses. Overall the song exhibits a reasonably high degree of musical invention mixing blues material cast in a relatively modern harmonic setting with traditional tonal music.

    Music Chart

    These are the known statistics for the various countries' music charts. If you can fill in the missing information or know of charting information in other countries, please let me know at the email address listed at the bottom of this page.

    Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12 Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 Week 16 Week 17 Week 18 Week 19 Week 20 Week 21 Week 22 Week 23 Week 24
    UK Official Top 50 Chart Entry Date: May 8, 1976
    41
    24
    21
    11
    9
    (June 5, 1976)
    12
    15
    33
    USA Billboard Hot 100 Chart Entry Date: July 4, 1976
    87
    77
    67
    57
    47
    42
    34
    30
    20
    17
    13
    7
    6
    (September 26, 1976)
    6
    (October 3, 1976)
    6
    (October 10, 1976)
    7
    14
    32
    51
    61
    80
    80
    USA Cash Box Top 100 Chart Entry Date: June 26, 1976
    88
    79
    70
    62
    57
    43
    30
    24
    17
    14
    12
    9
    7
    6
    5
    (October 2, 1976)
    5
    (October 9, 1976)
    5
    (October 16, 1976)
    16
    26
    33
    36
    42
    44
    67
    USA Record World Top 40 Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #5 during a run of an unknown number of weeks on the chart
    Australia Chart (Top 5 Only) Entry Date: October 4, 1976
    4
    3
    (October 11, 1976)
    3
    (October 18, 1976)
    5
    Note: It's known that the song ran for 26 weeks on the chart,
    however the scale and placings of that run are unknown beyond the Top 5
    Canada CHUM Chart Entry Date: August 18, 1976
    28
    20
    14
    12
    3
    (September 15, 1976)
    3
    (September 22, 1976)
    3
    (September 29, 1976)
    5
    4
    9
    11
    14
    20
    22
    30
    Canada RPM Top 100 Chart Entry Date: July 10, 1976
    98
    84
    74
    66
    51
    43
    32
    23
    21
    19
    9
    8
    8
    4
    (October 9, 1976)
    4
    (October 16, 1976)
    no chart published
    8
    11
    15
    22
    26
    28
    40
    France Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #10 on October 1, 1976 during a run of 13 weeks on the chart
    Hong Kong Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #9 during a run of an unknown number of weeks on the chart
    India Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #10 during a run of an unknown number of weeks on the chart
    Ireland Chart Entry Date: June 5, 1976
    16
    10
    7
    6
    (June 26, 1976)
    6
    (July 3, 1976)
    8
    13
    20
    24
    29
    Italy Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #39 during a run of an unknown number of weeks on the chart
    Malta Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #4 during a run of an unknown number of weeks on the chart
    New Zealand Chart Entry Date: July 2, 1976
    40
    18
    18
    5
    (July 23, 1976)
    10
    7
    6
    7
    6
    6
    9
    9
    11
    9
    7
    15
    14
    20
    21
    25
    32
    31
    32
    40
    Norway Top 10 Chart Entry Date: June 21, 1976
    9
    10
    8
    7
    (July 19, 1976)
    9
    7
    (August 2, 1976)
    South Africa Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #1 during a run of 15 weeks on the chart
    Thailand Chart Entry Date: [DATE UNKNOWN]
    Peak at #8 during a run of an unknown number of weeks on the chart

    Releases

    Here are all the known UK releases of the song:

    Devil Woman (Standard Release)

    Devil Woman (Edited Remix Version)

    Devil Woman (London Palladium - March 4 1978)

    Devil Woman (Edited Version) (London Palladium - March 4 1978)

    Devil Woman (Savoy Theatre, New York - April 2 1981)

    Devil Woman (Royal Albert Hall, London - November 23 1982)

    Devil Woman (Sydney, Australia - November 1984)

    Devil Woman (May 1988)

    Devil Woman (My Kinda Life Version)

    Devil Woman (Access All Areas Tour 1992)

    Devil Woman (Royal Albert Hall - September 1998)

    Carrie/Devil Woman (An Audience With Cliff Richard - November 13, 1999)

    Backing Vocalist Medley: Green Light / Devil Woman / Carrie (World Tour - February 22 2003)

    Devil Woman (Live And Kicking Tour - April/May 2004)

    Medley: Miss You Nights/Devil Woman/The Young Ones/We Don't Talk Anymore (Wembley Arena - November 8 2006)

    Devil Woman/Green Light (Wembley Arena - November 14 2008)

    Devil Woman (Royal Albert Hall - October 17 2010)

    Devil Woman (O2 Arena - October 26 2011)

    Tours

    Devil Woman has been performed on most all tours following its release. Cliff has taken to doing a particular cat-like dance on stage while performing the song.

    More information on Cliff's performance of Devil Woman on tour and various live performances will be determined at a future date.

    Pictures

    UK 7-inch single (EMI EMI 2458) I'm Nearly Famous LP UK 7-inch reissue single (EMI EMI 2458) USA 7-inch single (Rocket Record Company/MCA Records PIG-40574) USA 7-inch reissue single (Capitol Records URC 1107)
    UK vinyl single * EMI * EMI 2458 UK I'm Nearly Famous album * EMI * EMC 3122 UK vinyl 1981 re-issue single * EMI * EMI 2458 USA vinyl single * Rocket Record Company/MCA Records * PIG-40574 USA vinyl re-issue single * Capitol Records * URC 1107
    Holland 7-inch single (EMI 5C 006-06 143) Germany 7-inch single (EMI 1C 006-06143)
    Holland vinyl single * EMI * 5C 006-06 143 Germany vinyl single * EMI * 1C 006-06143

    Cover Versions

    Use in Movies and TV programs

    Sheet Music

       
    Please note that because this is published and copyrighted material, the full sheet music cannot be shown here.

    Promotional Videos and TV Performances

    There was a promotional video made of Devil Woman that features just Cliff and a microphone on a black soundstage. The entire video uses optical effects to show repeated images of Cliff singing the song that often fade into the background. The performance is a lip synch of the album/version of the song. And the video has never been commercially released.

    Televised performances of the song will be documented at length at a future date.

    Fan Comments

    Enter comments only about this song. (Inappropriate comments will be removed.)




    Does anyone know about the version that appears on the NZ comp "Their 40 Big Ones?"?? I can provide a sample if it helps. It fades out very early, earlier than any other version i've ever heard.



    Tell the world what you think of Devil Woman. What do you think of Cliff singing such a scandalous song? :)

    Quotations

    Devil Woman (Standard Release)
    "[Devil Woman is] still No. 1 in my chart!"
    Cliff Richard (1985 - liner notes for From The Heart album)

    "I record a song, even a track like Devil Woman, for instance, with no apparent Christian message, and offer it to the Lord and let him do the rest. I heard of two people, would you believe, who became Christians as an indirect result of listening to that particular song. [...] Here I am, having spent more time in the UK charts than any other artist (The Beatles included)-- with the sole exception of Elvis-- yet the average American will never have heard of me. He or she will probably recognise a song title-- Devil Woman, We Don't Talk Anymore, Dreamin', Daddy's Home and others were all decent-sized Top Thirty hits over the years. But as for Cliff Richard, the name won't mean a light."
    Cliff Richard (1988 - Single-Minded)

    "At #10 [in the BBC Radio 2 Cliff Toppers program] is Cliff's all time favourite song, Devil Woman, which gave him a special thrill in 1976 when it nearly helped him to make it in America."
    Mike Read (May 1992 - Cliff Toppers BBC radio special)

    "We were doing a concert tour of the east. And we were starting Hong Kong. And it was about the third night, the last night in Hong Kong and Bruce Welch was in the band. And somehow they must have got word to him because while I was [on stage] talking into the mike to introduce a song, he just came over and he whispered, '18 with a bullet.' But it was that phraseology and I knew exactly what he meant. There's only one country in the world that uses bullets and I knew that we'd made the States. But, of course, I didn't think it was going to get to #5. And I didn't think we were going to get a gold disc out of it too. I think it sold about a million and a half."
    Cliff Richard (May 1992 - Cliff Toppers BBC radio special)

    "The most successful of [the 1976 singles], Devil Woman reached No.9 and Miss You Nights No.15... For the September 1975 sessions at Abbey Road, three songs had been channelled to Cliff through Bruce Welch, who was producer for Devil Woman, I Can't Ask For Anymore Than You and Miss You Nights. Collectively these singles showed that Cliff had not only caught up with the contemporary scene, but was breaking new ground as well. April 23 1976: Cliff's 66th single, Devil Woman/Love On [sic], is released. One reviewer, Bob Edmonds, asks: 'Has Cliff been caught up again? He cut a previous single, Honky Tonk Angel, without apparently knowing what it was about. This time someone may have forgotten to tell him what the words devil and woman mean. You see, Cliffie, a devil is a naughty person and a woman is more or less a person of the opposite sex. Now, is it right for an upstanding young man to sing about naughtiness and sex? Isn't this just setting a bad example to his followers?' June 26 1976: Devil Woman picks up heavy 'FM' air-play on San Fanciscan radio stations. August 1976: In America, Devil Woman enters the Cashbox and Billboard charts to give Cliff his third-ever hit Stateside and his first since It's All In The Game in 1964. October 1976: His single Devil Woman becomes Cliff Richard's biggest-ever hit on the other side of the Atlantic, making both the No.6 position in the Billboard charts and the No. 5 spot in the rival Cash Box chart."
    Mike Read, Nigel Goodall & Peter Lewry (1995 - The Complete Chronicle)

    "...there is a common misconception that Cliff had no success in the United States until Devil Woman in 1976. Although it is true that the Rocket Records release was his first American Top Tenner, Living Doll did reach the US Top 30 [in 1959]."
    Paul Gambaccini (1997 - liner notes for The Rock 'N' Roll Years 1958-1963 album)

    "It would be difficult to decide whether Devil Woman or We Don't Talk Anymore [as one of my greatest experiences]. Devil Woman, I think, is the record I'd most like to be remembered for. But We Don't Talk Anymore is the biggest single I ever sung. [...] Yeah, [Devil Woman was about the occult], but it was a warning against the occult. In fact, I added some words... I just changed... You don't have to change many words to make it positive. Originally, it was just the story of a man who goes and meets with a woman who can read the future. And he had nothing but bad luck. And that's okay, but I thought to myself, I don't want to sing about the occult unless I speak against it. And so all I did was change a few lyrics and said, 'You'd better stay away. Beware the devil woman. If you find yourself with her, then get out of there fast.' And I changed it and made it really positive. And the really good part of this story is that when I was in Australia a girl came to me... She wrote a letter saying, 'I was about to become involved with the occult and I heard Devil Woman.' And she said, 'I listened to the lyrics and I listened to the warning and I didn't go.' And she said, 'I'm only writing to tell you now that I'm a Christian in this church in Melbourne and God has entered my life.' And I thought, isn't that fantastic. Devil Woman may have been recorded... I know I like it. I'm sure a lot of you would have liked Devil Woman. But I like to think that this song was written for her because it saved her life."
    Cliff Richard (December 26, 1998 - Musikbutikken TV show)

    "It is ironic that what is arguably the most significant recording date of Cliff Richard's post rock 'n' roll career came about almost by accident, when, in one forty-eight hour period in September 1975, Cliff made the decision to record, under the production guidance of Bruce Welch, Devil Woman and Miss You Nights. It was these two recordings, later released as top side singles in February and May 1976 respectively, that would set the tone for what many would call the renaissance of Cliff Richard's recording career. Cliff had already been given... Devil Woman, the story of a seductive fortune teller, not by Welch, but by the writer Terry Britten, some months earlier but had done nothing with it. It was only through Welch's sheer persistence and a no let-up pressure that Cliff ended up recording the song, exactly as the demo had sounded... Although Miss You Nights, the first single to be released [from the I'm Nearly Famous sessions] sold well enough to place Cliff back in the top twenty for the first time in two years, ever since Hangin' On [sic] charted just outside the ten in May 1974, it was Devil Woman, released two months later that re-established his chart presence once more, eventually becoming Cliff's biggest selling single since The Young Ones in 1961. He was also given another chance of a stab at the American singles market, thanks to Elton John and manager John Reid's Rocket label releasing the track that June. [...] With Devil Woman, things momentarily changed. The record entered the Billboard charts at number eighty-four, and over the coming two months slowly crept its way into the top ten eventually peaking at number six, becoming in the process Cliff's first American million seller. Released in May 1976 this single gave Cliff his first top ten single since Power To All Our Friends back in 1973. After entering the chart on 8 May 1976 at #41 it climbed to #9 during a run of 12 weeks. The single qualified for a gold award from the Record Industry Association of America."
    Peter Lewry & Nigel Goodall (July 2001 - liner notes for I'm Nearly Famous remaster album)

    "And then, of course, there's Devil Woman. I mean, I think Devil Woman again is much more contemporary than Move It, but I love songs that tell stories with hooks in the chorus line. And it's got a hook guitar."
    Cliff Richard (April 2002 - Top Of The Pops internet interview)

    "As [Terry] Britten has previously done with Devil Woman [songwriters], the riff came from him, the story from someone else. With Devil Woman, it was from Christine Holmes, a singer and children's television presenter who came up with the title and wrote the story."
    Peter Lewry & Nigel Goodall (July 2001 - liner notes for Rock 'N' Roll Juvenile remaster album)

    "...If a Martian came down and said, 'What dod you do?' I'd want to play him Devil Woman."
    Cliff Richard (2003 October 28 - interview on Radio 96.4, The Eagle)

    "In the case of Devil Woman, for instance... You know, it's interesting, when I first recorded Devil Woman, the press in Britain said, 'Oh!' They tutted their tongues and said, 'Oh my goodness! Here's Christian Cliff Richard singing about the devil and you know, devil is Satan and woman is sex. Sex and Satan! Oh, Cliff!' And I guess they were just having fun. But they kind of missed the point as quite often critics do miss the point. Particularly if they're not necessarily fans of yours. And I can understand that people aren't fans of everybody that they criticize. Devil Woman in fact, was a song that is anti-the occult. So it was easy for me to agree to sing it. It was-- I did change some of the lyrics to make sure that it was anti-occult. And I don't know whether I've told you this Steve and Johnnie, when I went to Australia once, I got a letter from a girl saying she was about to become involved with the occult, when a friend of hers said, 'Look, I know your a fan of Cliff's. Just listen to this new record, Devil Woman.' And she said in her letter, 'I listened to the song and I heeded the warning in the lyrics. And I'm now a member of a church in Melbourne and helping run the Sunday school...' And I'm thinking, 'Oh my goodness. That record may well have been recorded just for her.'"
    Cliff Richard (February 18, 2005 - WGN Radio 720 Chicago interview)

    "Well, there was [a bit of controversy about the lyrics], but the controversy shouldn't have been there 'cause I'd already dealt with the lyrics before I ever recorded it. I don't record anything I'd ever find dangerous-- I mean dangerous in a bad way. I mean, Heathcliff was dangerous for me to do as an artist. But I don't like doing songs that are negative in some sense or [are] dangerous to people. Now Devil Woman was written just strictly about a song about somebody who got involved with the occult. Now I wasn't as a Christian going to say 'let's just leave it like that and if people want to dabble in the occult, they can.' The truth is, of course, they can if they want to. But I turned it into a warning against the occult. That's why it says, 'beware the devil woman. Stay away. And if you're in her company, you'd better get out of there fast.' And so, I turned it into a positive thing. And in fact, I know it worked because I got a letter from a woman in Australia who said she was a fan and she says, 'I was about to get dabbling in the occult.' There's something happening in her life, she's depressed and all that. A friend of hers said, 'Okay, you're a fan of Cliff's. Listen to this!' And she said, 'I heard Devil Woman. I heeded the warning in the lyrics. And I want to tell you now, I didn't get involved with the occult and I'm now a member of the St. John's church or whatever it is and I run the school choir.' I can't remember what it was. And I thought, 'Isn't it fantastic that one song can do that-- can turn someone's life around.' It actually turned her life around. And so, the controversy was because people are always dying for me to sing about the devil and women. And they took Devil Woman-- Because journalist tend to-- they don't really dig deep enough. And I don't think that they really quite know what we're doing. They ought to know what we're doing, really, but they don't."
    Cliff Richard (2005 March 27 - interview on 107.7 Splash FM with Dave Hunt)

    "The intro to Devil Woman - I got that idea from Heard It through the Grapevine [sic]. Without a doubt. 'Cause I was so fascinated with the mystery of [Sings intro melody to Grapevine] and the atmosphere it created straight away. When you listen to Devil Woman at the start it's got the real mystery to it. You don't know quite what's going to happen. It's a bit of a riff, yeah. I like riffs. I can use it a few times. Carrie was another one. Actually it was quite involved, that one, but still had that mystery. I love creating atmosphere, it's really important. Yeah [Devil Woman was quite a radical departure for Cliff Richard in 1976] I had that riff for quite a while and at sound checks I'd just work on it. And then I got together with somebody who did a few lyrics and I don't know how that came about, we've only ever written the one song together. But these odd things happen in your life which are fantastic. You suddenly find yourself in a flat in Kensington, co-writing. You think 'Why the hell am I doing this? I don't want to work with this person.' And then you find yourself there. I said, 'Well, let's write a song for Cliff. I've got this riff.' And she came up with a title, and I thought, well it's not a very original title, it's been done. There had already been a song called Devil Woman, a country song. Marty Robbins. But it worked. And it was commercial. Christine Holmes, her name was. She was a TV presenter at one time. Oh yeah, [Cliff liked it straight away and] Bruce Welch went crazy. We had a great time recording it at Abbey Road. It was fantastic. And then it all went horribly wrong. 'Cause Cliff had this Honky Tonk Angel song out and somebody said, 'Oh, Cliff obviously doesn't know what a honky tonk angel is, a prostitute, and here is Cliff Richard, the Christian, singing about a prostitute.' And poor old naive Cliff, as soon as he realise, he pulled the record. Killed it off. And of course what's the next thing you do after that? Well you can't do that, you see. So it sat on the shelf for a year. We recorded it in '74 at Abbey Road, Allan Clarke from the Hollies was walking down the corridor, came in, put his head around and went, 'That's a hit.' And the engineer went, 'America. This is going to be a hit in America.' And Cliff's never had a hit in America, so I'm going, 'Ah, people, what do they know?' Mr Confidence, you know. But when they brought it out, I remember I was in Epsom in the kitchen, I was making my breakfast, it was eight o'clock in the morning, and it came on and he said, 'Listen to this! You're never going to guess who this is!' He said, 'I'll play it again! I'll tell you what, let's have a competition. You ring in and tell me who you think this is singing this song.' And I don't believer this - twice he's played it. Then he played it three times in a row, and I'm going, 'Wow!' It sounded fantastic on the radio. And there was this buzz. It was huge in America. Even now, it gets played in America. I would have liked to do more like that, but Cliff being the beast that he is has got this thing about always trying something different. Which is accepted here, but in America you had Devil Woman out and in America if that's what you do, that's what you do. But he came out next with this falsetto, funny, lightweight track, and I thought, why on earth are they wasting this opportunity by not following through with a similar vibe?"
    Terry Britten (2005 - Songwriters Speak by Debbie Kruger)

    "And Cliff Richard reveals that Devil Woman (No 41) is his favourite vocal performance 'because it is my kind of rock'n'roll.'"
    Mark Brown (August 2, 2006 - The Guardian)

    "'I know I made the US Top 10 only thrice, Devil Woman went to No. 6 while both Dreamin' and We Don't Talk Anymore made it to 7,' he said, but was quick to point out that nothing could have made him any happier than he is with his career. "
    Author Unknown (2007 February 11 - The Sunday Times (Sri Lanka))

    "One of the most successful of the 1970s singles was Devil Woman, which although it missed the coveted chart position in the UK, it was #1 in South Africa. It was one of several singles from the I'm Nearly Famous ground-breaking album that saw Cliff return to the contemporary music scene."
    Nigel Goodall & Peter Lewry (2008 - liner notes for The Hits: Number Ones Around The World album in the ...And They Said It Wouldn't Last! {My 50 Years In Music} set)

    "In May 1976 I'm Nearly Famous, the first of three albums to be produced by Bruce Welch, gave Cliff his first Top 5 album of new material in over a decade and spawned three Top 10 hits including Devil Woman."
    Peter Lewry & Nigel Goodall (July 2010 - liner notes for The Collection album)

    "[Cliff Richard had] his comeback as a rock star in 1976 with the release of Devil Woman..."
    Author Unknown (December 18, 2011 - The Sunday Times)

    Steve Turner:

    "In one 48-hour period in September 1975, Welch produced Devil Woman and Miss You Nights. These two records, more than any others, were to set the tone for the rest of his career.

    It was [the demo] version of [Miss You Nights] that Welch took down to Cliff's home in Weybridge one summer evening along with Devil Woman written by Terry Britten and I Can't Ask For Anything More Than You by Ken Gold and Michael Denne.

    'Cliff put the cassette of Miss You Nights on in his music room and the hairs stood up on his arms,' remembers Welch. He'd already been given Devil Woman some months before but he hadn't done anything with it. I pushed him. I said, 'Why on earth haven't you recorded this song?'

    Devil Woman had started off as a riff which Terry Britten couldn't find words for and then he linked up with Christine Holmes, a singer and children's television presenter who had been produced by Dave Mackay, and she gave it a title and wrote the story of a seductive fortune teller.

    'I had my ideas about this fortune teller song in my notebook and Terry had this guitar riff and we just put them together,' says Holmes. 'We wrote it together in my flat.'

    'I knew it had to be a rock number. Helen Reddy had done a song called Angie Baby which was a really spooky song and used sounds in the mix that hadn't been used too much in pop music. In my mind I knew that I wanted Devil Woman to sound similarly spooky. We both very much knew what we wanted and Cliff copies the demo exactly.'

    When Cliff went into Abbey Road to record the three songs, Welch, as producer, retained Alan Tarney and Terry Britten from Dave Mackay's rhythm section but added Graham Todd on keyboards and Tony Rivers, John Perry and Ken Gold on backing vocals.

    'It was a great session the day we did Devil Woman,' remembers Terry Britten. The engineer Tony Clark was standing in front of the speakers as it was played back and as quick as a flash he said, America! This is gonna be a smash in America!'

    Tony Clark remembers the emotion of the session. 'You could feel something was happening,' he says. 'The actual groove of the track was something instant. When I said it was made for America I was probably more excited than anyone else. In those days it wasn't normal to stand up in the control room and shout out loud.'

    Three months later, with Devil Woman and Miss You Nights still unreleased as singles, the same team returned to the studio to complete an album of the songs that Welch had gathered.

    Miss You Nights was to be the first single released, in February 1976, because there was some concern that Devil Woman might get confused with the Electric Light Orchestra's Evil Woman which had entered the charts in January. It sold impressively and returned Cliff to the top twenty for the first time in two years, but it was Devil Woman, released two months later, which re-established him as a chart force.

    'I was sitting in my kitchen in Espom and the DJ said he was going to play a record and we should try and guess who it was,' remembers Terry Britten of the first radio play he heard. 'He played this record and my ears went up when I heard the first couple of bars. Then everyone started ringing in and getting it wrong and he played it again and there was this tremendous excitement that this was Cliff Richard. No one could believe that Cliff could make a record like this.'

    'Devil Woman sound like something that the Rolling Stones or at least Elton John would record. The voice was as clean as ever but the sound of the track was dirty and swampy. Cliff had never worked around a riff like this before and this story of seduction conjured up images of dark backstreets in New Orleans; of a world a million miles away from Take Me High.'

    The writer, Christine Holmes, says the song is about a man who is seduced by a fortune teller.

    'It's a very rude song actually,' admits Holmes. 'But I'm not sure Cliff was aware how rude it was. My whole thing was to convey that women can be very spooky and clever when they try to snare a guy. They can force a guy into doing things he wouldn't normally do. They can be witches when they want to be.'

    Cliff has indeed interpreted the lyrics in a different way, believing it to be a warning against dabbling in the occult. This view was endorsed for him when a young woman from Australia wrote to him to say that the song had been instrumental in her Christian conversion. 'I heeded the warning,' she told him.

    The music press was enthusiastic about the single, seeing it as a definite return to form. There was talk of the Cliff Richard Renaissance. The record climbed into the top ten, eventually becoming his biggest international seller since The Young Ones.

    Elton John's manager, John Reid, heard Miss You Nights and wanted to release it in America on his three-year-old record label, Rocket. Elton has long been a fan (he could remember seeing him in pantomime at the Palladium) and it was thought that maybe Rocket could launch Cliff in America in the way that it had recently reversed the fortunes of Neil Sedaka in his home country.

    Rocket's Executive Vice President in America was Tony King, a flamboyant English bachelor who had once worked for the Beatles' Apple label, and was closely acquainted with almost everyone who mattered in the rock industry.

    He listened to the album and concluded that although Miss You Nights was a good song, it was Devil Woman that stood the better chance of becoming a hit. He had the track remastered to match the sound quality of American radio and it was released in June.

    'We cut it really hot,' says King. 'Then I brought in publicist Sharon Lawrence who said that if we really want to crack America, Cliff would have to be brought over for a month to do press and radio. Peter Gormley agreed and so I went on the road with Cliff.

    'We had to promote him as someone fresh,' says Tony King. Devil Woman started picking up interest and getting added to secondary stations in each area but we still needed to crack a primary station. Within a month it began to edge in at the lower end of the charts and then we knew there was a chance it could make it.'

    'The most important radio stations to get on were those controlled by RKO. If you got on an RKO station it looked as though you were going to make it. The chain was run by a man named Paul Drew who was a friend of mine and of Elton John and of John Lennon but he was a tough guy and he wouldn't do anything to give me a break.'

    'However because he was a friend, if he saw that I has something that looked as if it had legs he would maybe tip it a little in my direction. But only if the evidence was that he couldn't be accused of helping out a friend.'

    'When Devil Woman looked as though it was really happening he gave us the break that really cracked it. He gave us the number one station in Boston and that gave us a good chart position the next week. Once it performed well on that station the rest fell like dominoes.' The record entered the US charts at number 88 at the end of June and slowly began to climb through July and August.

    When it finally broke into the top ten Cliff was playing in Leningrad and Moscow on a ground-breaking Russian visit-- the first by a Western rock artist. It was a strange experience of playing to a mixture of sober-suited party officials and excited teenagers, with security leaping into action every time anyone showed any physical signs of appreciation.

    'We were calling back home to get the Billboard chart positions all the time,' remembers Terry Britten. 'The news that it was going up really kept us going out there.'

    Devil Woman went on to reach number five in the Billboard charts and to become an American million-seller. [...] When Devil Woman entered the Billboard charts Bruce Welch walked across the stage during a concert in Hong Kong and whispered the news in [Cliff's] ear."


    Steve Turner (2008 January - Cliff Richard - The Biography (revised edition))

    "I have had nine Top 30 hits over here [in the US] and two of them were million sellers-- We Don't Talk Anymore [and] Devil Woman. There were a success. [...] If you said to me now, a Martian is going to land (and who knows, he might now that we're there)... A Martian might come down and you have to play him something that lets him know what you do, I would play him Devil Woman. Yeah, I would. To me that's iconic type rock 'n' roll-- guitar, fabulous guitar riff, great melody, unbelievable chorus, and it's got a storyline. And I think to myself, that's what I would play him. And I've had bigger hits, of course, sometimes that's not the point."
    Cliff Richard (2012 September 8 - Wired For Sound Radio)

    "Bruce [Welch] got me to do [the backing vocal arrangements] for this first session he fixed up for Abbey Road, which I was fairly used to because the Castaways made all their-- most of their singles at Abbey Road, there was one we made independently. So Abbey Road was a good place for us to go back to because it had now become Abbey Road-- the world knew about Abbey Road. So to go there and start recording in the same studio that The Beatles made all their classic stuff... And that's where we made Miss You Nights, Devil Woman and I Can't Ask For Anymore Than You, all on the first session I ever did for him. All three were hits. [...] Devil Woman was a great record. And we were on it! You know, it's simple harmonies, nothing clever like Miss You Nights which is a little bit more full, you know, harmony wise. We just did the three part harmony behind Cliff on Devil Woman. He sang the chorus, he used [unintelligible]. That just the four of us standing there going 'she's just a devil woman with evil on her...' That in unison. And at the end, Cliff goes off into his falsetto astronomical direction and that's us doing 'she's just a devil...'"
    Tony Rivers (2012 September 8 - Wired For Sound Radio)

    "[In regards to my favourite song I would say] if a Martian landed here, at this moment, and asked us what we did for a living, I'm not sure what you would tell him, but I wouldn't say a word. I would give him a copy of Devil Woman and say, 'here.' [pantomimes handing something over] So Devil Woman is what I like."
    Cliff Richard (September 4, 2013 - Channel 5 News)

    Devil Woman (USA Single Version)
    In the USA, it was decided that Devil Woman was a good single, but it needed a little more punch. So it was remastered, giving the bass and drums more kick. In addition, the song's fade out was changed to slightly earlier, cutting the last two lines of the fifth chorus-- it's assumed that this earlier fade was inadvertant and done by an engineer who was a little too fast on the knob. This version was on the USA single only (Rocket Record Company PIG-2210) with the I'm Nearly Famous album that was issued in the US having the standard master that was released worldwide. This version first appeared elsewhere on the 1989 40 Golden Greats CD, then reappeared on the 1998 1970s album and has been released on all compilations and reissues since. It's not entirely clear why the USA mix was used on all these compilations and has since supplanted the original mix, however, it is thought that this was done in error when the 40 Golden Greats CD was first compiled. Several songs on that CD were slightly remastered from the album's LP counterpart, so the wrong master may have been accidentally chosen for the project. A comarison of these mixes can be heard HERE. The first part heard is the original album version, followed by the USA single mix (both the intro and the fade are heard).

    Devil Woman (London Palladium - March 4 1978)
    "[For the Thank You Very Much concert and album] the old hits were mainly drawn from the sixties repertoire while, for new material, naturally the recent his Devil Woman was chosen..."
    Mike Read, Nigel Goodall & Peter Lewry (1995 - The Complete Chronicle)

    "But with Cliff's older material, [John] Tobler continued in his review, things were somewhat different. '...more contemporary hits like Miss You Nights and Devil Woman were unsurprisingly very similar to the recorded versions, which is a tribute to the ability of Cliff and his band to reproduce their recorded sound in a live environment.'"
    Peter Lewry & Nigel Goodall (July 2004 - liner notes for Thank You Very Much remaster album)

    Devil Woman (Edited Version) (London Palladium - March 4 1978)
    This edit appears on the Thank You Very Much videotape release. It is an edit of the album version, with a short portion of the repeated ending cut.

    Devil Woman (Savoy Theatre, New York - April 2 1981)

    Devil Woman (Royal Albert Hall, London - November 23 1982)

    Devil Woman (Sydney, Australia - November 1984)

    Devil Woman (May 1988)

    Devil Woman (My Kinda Life Version)
    This version uses the original 1975 take of the song, but adds new guitars over the existing backing track and the fade out is extended by an additional 15 seconds.

    Devil Woman (Access All Areas Tour 1992)

    Devil Woman (Royal Albert Hall - September 1998)

    Carrie/Devil Woman (An Audience With Cliff Richard - November 13, 1999)
    This is the first verse and chorus of Carrie combined with a nearly complete Devil Woman.

    Backing Vocalist Medley: Green Light / Devil Woman / Carrie (World Tour - February 22 2003)

    Devil Woman (Live And Kicking Tour - April/May 2004)

    Devil Woman/Green Light (Wembley Arena - November 14 2008)

    Devil Woman (Royal Albert Hall - October 17 2010)

    Devil Woman (O2 Arena - October 26 2011)

    This page is intended to be a complete record of information on the Cliff Richard song Devil Woman. If you notice any errors or omissions, please contact me at rlp321@juno.com and let me know. I strive for accuracy.

    Robert Porter
    April 2014